German cities: Part 2

Today I bring you two cities from Germany that apparently have nothing to do with each other: Münster and Dresden.

Münster is in western Germany, while Dresden is in eastern Germany. One was under the influence of capitalism after the World War II; the other one became communist.

Münster is a very lively city. It is full of students (and full of bikes!), being culturally closer to the Netherlands. Dresden is rather an artistic and tourist city, with plenty of worthy museums.

So what do these cities have in common?

Although you may guess it when going through the pictures, the historical parts of Münster and Dresden were both rebuilt after the World War II, unlike many other cities, by faithfully following the patterns in accordance with which they had first been designed.

Even if they cannot be objectively regarded as authentic, the buildings look almost the same as they were before the World War II.

But, what is authentic? Aren’t there many restoration works that, by adding new patterns and elements, detract greatly from an artwork’s value in terms of authenticity? What do you think?

Here below is the photographic report of Münster and Dresden. I hope you enjoy it.

Münster:

DSCN8031_edited (2)

DSCN8057_edited (4)

DSCN8108_edited (3)

DSCN8113_edited (2)

Dresden:

DSCN7765 (2)

DSCN7781_edited (2)

DSCN7795_edited (2)

DSCN7812_edited (3)

DSCN7819_edited (2)

DSCN7820_edited (2)

DSCN7842_edited (2)

By clicking on the link you will see the Part 1 of this series of posts relating to German cities.

Thanks for stopping by,

Eleazar.

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13 comentarios en “German cities: Part 2

    • I had the same impression! 🙂
      That’s why I was questioning the notion of authenticty; sometimes it’s very difficult to know whether the first wish of the original architect has been respected or not through successive restorations.
      A proper rebuilding may be more respectful than an audacious restoration.

      Le gusta a 1 persona

  1. Pingback: German cities: Part 3 | L'éternel et l'éphémère

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