German cities: Part 1

Despite being devastated in the World War II, and having lost most of its heritage, Germany has proved to know how to rebuild its identity.

In most cases it was decided to reinterpret the medieval architecture from the old cities, using new materials and putting into practice new techniques, while preserving the essential features of the old buildings gone.

Beyond that, Germany has been the centre of the development of the contemporary architecture in Europe. The dictates of rationalism and functionalism (simplicity of forms, absence of ornaments…) were followed when rebuilding the devastated cities.

Germany has a new identity, built in accordance with both old and new trends. This is why it is still very interesting to discover its cities.

Like the phoenix, Germany rises from its own ashes.

Aachen, the preferred residence of Charlemagne, and the place where 31 Holy Roman Emperors were crowned Kings of the Germans:

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Bonn, home city of Ludwig van Beethoven and capital of West Germany until 1990:

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Cologne, the capital of the Rhine River, with its majestic gothic cathedral, being the 4th largest city in Germany:

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Düsseldorf, renowned for its fashion and trade fairs, in the centre of one of the most industrialised regions in Europe, and an important location of contemporary architecture:

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Frankfurt, with its identifiable skyline, home city of Goethe and indisputable financial centre in Germany, hosting the European Central Bank and the German stock exchange market:

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Heidelberg, a college town hosting the oldest university of Germany. Eminent German thinkers, such as Hegel and Hannah Arendt, found in this romantic small city the source of their inspiration:

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Please take a quick look at my old posts about Dutch cities and French cities.
Get inspired by the differences between Germany, France and the Netherlands.

Eleazar.

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16 comentarios en “German cities: Part 1

  1. Magnífica reportaje, Eleazar! te va a costar mejorar esta 1ª parte. Me encantan las fotografías arquitectónicas, son uno de mis puntos flacos. Si tuviera que elegir alguna de tus imágenes, me resultaría difícil escoger. Un abrazo.

    Le gusta a 1 persona

  2. Pingback: German cities: Part 2 | L'éternel et l'éphémère

  3. Pingback: German cities: Part 3 | L'éternel et l'éphémère

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